Historic Aircraft Wrecks of San Diego County


Clear weather and a natural harbor made San Diego an early aviation hub, but success in flight came with devastating tragedies. The remains of more than four hundred aircrafts lie scattered across the county s deserts and mountains. Experts estimate that dozens more are on the ocean floor off the coast. In 1922, army pilot Charles F. Webber s DeHavilland biplane went missing over Cuyamaca Rancho State Park. In 1978, Pacific Southwest Airlines Flight 178 collided midair over San Diego and crashed

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  1. Nicholas A. Veronico says:
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Wreck profiles from the beginning of the aviation age to the new millennium, November 24, 2016
    By 
    Nicholas A. Veronico (Bay Area, California) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    In a typical year, San Diego County has more than 265 days of sunny flying weather. There has always been a great deal of military flying in the area, and the wartime production and later experimental aircraft operating from the Convair plant at Lindbergh Field through the late 1940s to the mid-1960s contributes to the interest in the areaâ??s aviation history.

    Southern California native, aviation archaeologist, and author G. Pat Macha has been exploring and documenting historic aircraft wrecks for more than 50 years. Having written a half dozen books on crashes and crash sites, Machaâ??s latest work, Historic Aircraft Wrecks of San Diego County (The History Press, 978-1-46711-836-1, $21.99) details wrecks in the area from the beginning of the aviation age to the new millennium. His knowledge of where these aircraft came to rest has also enabled him and to take numerous relatives to the final resting places of these aircraft bringing closure to many family members. Macha brings out the human side of each accident, whether the occupants survived or met a tragic end, showing the depth of his research, and this attention to detail makes for an interesting read.

    Historic Aircraft Wrecks of San Diego County is broken up into sections describing aircraft wrecks up to World War II, the war years, those that occurred in the tremendous growth years after the war, and concludes with an interesting chapter detailing a number of crash sites off the San Diego coast. Many of the wreck types described in the book are extremely rare, including a Douglas TBD-1 Devistator and a Vought O2U-3 Corsair. Commercial wrecks detailed include American Airlinesâ?? DC-3 NC21799 Flagship Baltimore, and the Sept. 25, 1978, mid-air of a C-172 and a PSA Boeing 727. Off-shore wrecks run the gamut from the usual fare of Navy aircraft and detail other interesting types that went down into the sea off San Diego including a 10-engine B-36D Peacemaker. There are dozens more historical aircraft profiles in this highly informative book. It is a great companion to Historic Aircraft Wrecks of San Bernardino County and Historic Aircraft Wrecks of Los Angeles County.

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  2. Final Flight says:
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This is especially the best of Pat Macha’s series of his county-by-county survey of …, September 15, 2016
    By 
    Final Flight (Washington) –

    This is especially the best of Pat Macha’s series of his county-by-county survey of Aircraft Wrecks in southern California. I particularly appreciated how Macha focused on one aircraft accident with each chapter and tied that event to similar tragedies. Pat Macha is a living and breathing treasure for historians everywhere who want to learn about making the past alive. For anyone with an interest in aircraft accidents and their causes and results, you can’t go wrong with Pat Macha. One can’t wait for the next book in this series.
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